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Displaying records 1 - 10 of 21
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  1. Source:U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR)
    Date Published:03/24/2017
    Format:PDF
    Annotation:This eight-page document from TRACIE (Technical Resources, Assistance Center, Information Exchange) provides information on and links to select disaster behavioral health (DBH) programs and resources that can be of immediate use to emergency healthcare providers, emergency management stakeholders, and other professionals and survivors affected by naturally-occurring or human-caused incidents. Resource categories are General DBH Resources for Emergency Medical Responders; DBH Tools and Planning Guidance; Select State DBH Plans; Self-Care Resources: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Disaster Technical Assistance Center (SAMHSA DTAC); Self-Care Resources: Other Sources; and Training Programs.
    Type:Bibliography/Resource List
    ID:14585. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  2. Source:U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC)
    Date Published:03/23/2017
    Format:PDF
    Annotation:This 64-page report describes work to collect information and experimental data needed for technical experts to provide simple and useful guidance for residents of the effects of using low-tech remediation options available in the United States following a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear incident. A team gathered the information in a list of 14 housekeeping activities for decontamination evaluation testing. These activities are collectively referred to as low-tech remediation methods because of the comparative simple tools, equipment, and operations involved.
    Authors:Lee, Sang Don
    Type:Report
    ID:14581. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  3. Source:Trust for America's Health
    Date Published:03/23/2017
    Annotation:This web page provides materials from a Congressional briefing about protecting the public from diseases, disasters, and bioterrorism, and a report that assessed state capabilities and policies related to 10 preparedness indicators. A speaker discusses the report's examination of national policies, and recommendations to improve baseline capabilities and effective response. Another speaker discusses Boston's resilience strategy, its resilience strategy theory of change, and the 100 Resilient Cities program.
    Authors:Auerbach, John; Martin, S. Atyia
    Type:Instructional/Training Material
    ID:14592. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  4. Source:American Society for Microbiology (ASM)
    Date Published:03/21/2017
    Format:PDF
    Annotation:This eight-page document summarizes a meeting held on August 3, 2016, to identify needs and potential opportunities for American Society for Microbiology action on antimicrobial resistance in the areas of stewardship and surveillance, environmental issues, clinical issues, and global perspectives. The intent of these actions is to complement and leverage existing efforts, identify areas where there are currently gaps, and then catalyze additional activities.
    Type:Conference/Meeting Material
    ID:14586. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  5. Source:University of Minnesota, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP)
    Date Published:03/21/2017
    Format:Video or Multimedia
    Annotation:This one-hour, 24-minute lecture discusses the global outbreaks of Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), yellow fever, and Zika that have demonstrated how infectious diseases have the power to disrupt daily life, overwhelm public and private resources, and bring trade and transportation to a halt. It discusses a book of the same name that draws on the latest medical science, case studies, policy research, and epidemiological lessons to explore the resources and programs needed to keep people safe from infectious disease.
    Authors:Osterholm, Michael
    Type:Instructional/Training Material
    ID:14583. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  6. Source:United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
    Date Published:03/21/2017
    Format:PDF
    Annotation:This 286-page report sets forward policy recommendations at the national level and looks at ways in which the global development landscape could be made more effective in the fight to leave no one behind and achieve the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It discusses how epidemics, violence, climate change, and natural disasters can quickly undermine the progress of those who have moved out of poverty; and how pandemics, natural disasters, climate change, economic and financial crises, and other shocks can slow, reverse, or completely derail human development.
    Authors:Jahan, Selim
    Type:Report
    ID:14582. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  7. Source:University of New Hampshire (UNH)
    Date Published:03/21/2017
    Format:PDF
    Annotation:This six-page issue brief investigates how New Hampshire residents view the Zika crisis by asking if Zika is perceived as a threat to public health in the United States, and if the public trusts the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for information about the virus. It also asks if the public is confident that the government can control the spread of Zika, and explores whether the public's increasing distrust of science and scientists may affect views about the Zika pandemic.
    Authors:Safford, Thomas; Hamilton, Lawrence; Whitmore, Emily
    Type:Report
    ID:14584. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  8. Source:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Division of Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT)
    Date Published:03/2017
    Format:PDF
    Annotation:This eight-page guidance document provides additional information to entities or individuals who request to exclude attenuated strains of select agents or select toxins modified to be less potent or toxic from the requirements of the select agent regulations. It also covers Request to Appeal a Decision Denying an Exclusion Request, and Exclusion of Select Agents or Toxins Seized by a Federal Law Enforcement Agency.
    Type:Guideline/Assessment Tool
    ID:14570. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  9. Source:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Division of Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT)
    Date Published:03/2017
    Format:PDF
    Annotation:This 10-page guidance document provides information about the requirement that individuals who access select agents and toxins must receive information and training concerning biocontainment, biosafety, security (including security awareness), and incident response. Other topics include Specific Work Related Training, Tier 1 Biological Select Agents and Toxins Training, Training of Individuals, Individuals with Access, Visitors, and Frequency of Training.
    Type:Guideline/Assessment Tool
    ID:14569. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  10. Source:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Division of Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT)
    Date Published:03/2017
    Format:PDF
    Annotation:This 15-page guidance document provides additional information to regulated entities for meeting the requirements for an accurate and current inventory for each select agent (including viral genetic elements, recombinant and/or synthetic nucleic acids, and recombinant and/or synthetic organisms) held in long-term storage; any animals or plants intentionally or accidentally exposed to or infected with a select agent (including number and species, location, and appropriate disposition); and for each toxin held.
    Type:Guideline/Assessment Tool
    ID:14573. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     

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