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Displaying records 1 - 10 of 40
  • of 4
  1. Source:Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
    Date Published:05/24/2016
    Format:Video or Multimedia
    Annotation:This one-hour, four-minute webinar discusses how U.S. officials will manage the spread of the Zika virus, while communicating a complex, evolving crisis. Speakers discuss how local outbreaks are likely to occur in the southern United States in the summer of 2016 as mosquito populations multiply, why social engagement and public information campaigns will be an important part of the response as a vaccine is developed, and how the earliest date for a vaccine is estimated to be late 2017.
    Authors:Harman, Jane; Fauci, Anthony S.; Molinari, Susan; et al.
    Type:Instructional/Training Material
    ID:12724. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  2. Source:Safeguarding Health in Conflict
    Date Published:05/23/2016
    Format:PDF (60 pages)
    Annotation:This 60-page report reviews attacks on and interference with hospitals, health workers, ambulances, medical supply transports, and patients in armed conflict and times of political violence that violated these obligations in 2015 and during the first three months of 2016. Attacks on health services can be grouped into four major categories: Bombing, shelling, and looting facilities or transports; violence inflicted on health workers independent of an attack on a facility or transport; military takeover of hospitals, or fighting in and around hospitals; and obstruction of access to health care, medicine, and essential supplies.
    Authors:Rubenstein, Leonard; Bales, Carol; Halpin, Maeve; et al.
    Type:Report
    ID:12712. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  3. Source:United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
    Date Published:05/20/2016
    Format:PDF (147 pages)
    Annotation:This 147-page report focuses on recent flood disasters that struck Bosnia and Herzegovina, Albania, Croatia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia, and Kosovo. A joint vulnerability of the region to disasters calls for a vigorous assessment of the trans-boundary hazards and an expedition of knowledge transfer mechanisms to boost the capacities for risk identification, assessment, monitoring, and early warning in the Western Balkans. The report identifies the key roadblocks and opportunities to this end, and calls for action aimed at risk-proofing the Western Balkans.
    Authors:Sirco, Armin; Tadjbakhsh, Shahrbanou; Divan, Nera; et al.
    Type:Report
    ID:12720. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  4. Source:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Date Published:05/20/2016
    Format:PDF (8 pages)
    Annotation:This eight-page document provides information and key messages about how, as of May 20, 2016, national reporting of the number of U.S. pregnant women affected by Zika virus infection changed. Previously, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported the number of pregnant women with Zika virus disease, which included pregnant women with both laboratory test results and symptoms or pregnancy complications consistent with Zika. CDC will now report pregnancy data from two enhanced surveillance systems: the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, and the Puerto Rico Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System, both of which include pregnant women with any laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection, with or without symptoms, and their infants.
    Type:Guideline/Assessment Tool
    ID:12722. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  5. Source:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Date Published:05/20/2016
    Annotation:This resource reports on the number of pregnant women with any laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection in the United States and territories. It describes what these statistical numbers show and do not show, and where the statistics come from.
    Type:Report
    ID:12687. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  6. Source:European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control
    Date Published:05/20/2016
    Format:PDF (19 pages)
    Annotation:This 19-page document assesses the risks associated with the Zika virus epidemic currently affecting countries in the Americas, taking account the latest information available. It provides updated information for travelers to affected countries and European Union citizens residing in areas with active transmission. It also assesses the association between Zika virus infection and congenital central nervous system malformations, including microcephaly, as well as the association between Zika virus infection and Guillain-Barré syndrome.
    Type:Guideline/Assessment Tool
    ID:12711. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  7. Source:World Health Organization (WHO)
    Date Published:05/19/2016
    Annotation:This resource summarizes a meeting of the World Health Organization Emergency Committee, which was briefed on the history and impact of the Yellow Fever Initiative; the urban outbreak of yellow fever in Luanda, Angola; and its national and international spread to the Democratic Republic of Congo, China, and Kenya. The Committee was provided with additional information on the evolving risk of urban yellow fever in Africa and the status of the global stockpile of yellow fever vaccine.
    Type:Conference/Meeting Material
    ID:12685. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  8. Source:World Health Organization (WHO)
    Date Published:05/19/2016
    Format:PDF (6 pages)
    Annotation:This six-page document provides an update (as of May 19, 2016) on the Zika virus outbreak. It reports on the countries reporting Zika transmission; provides a map of the global spread of Zika virus, 2013-2016; and includes tables detailing the countries, territories, and areas reporting microcephaly and/or central nervous system malformation cases, or Guillain-Barre cases potentially associated with Zika virus infection. It provides a table summary of key response interventions.
    Type:Report
    ID:12668. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  9. Source:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Date Published:05/19/2016
    Annotation:This resource provides information about why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention does not recommend routine use of insecticides (disinsection) inside commercial passenger airplanes to prevent the spread of Zika virus. It describes the limitations with respect to the use of disinsection in airplanes to control the spread of Zika virus, and the recommendation that other local public health interventions should be the primary focus to prevent local transmission of Zika virus.
    Type:Guideline/Assessment Tool
    Access Notes:Link to resource in Portuguese: http://portugues.cdc.gov/zika/vector/disinsection.html
    Link to resource in Spanish: http://espanol.cdc.gov/enes/zika/vector/disinsection.html
    ID:12721. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     
  10. Source:World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)
    Date Published:05/19/2016
    Format:PDF (15 pages)
    Annotation:This 15-page document presents the guidance that resulted from the Zika Ethics Consultation convened by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) on April 6-7, 2016, on the issues that affected countries had previously identified as most ethically challenging in the context of the Zika virus outbreak. Ethical duties in the domains of health care delivery, public health activity, and research are explained. With respect to health care delivery, women's moral right to choose among all relevant reproductive options is highlighted.
    Authors:Saenz, Carla; Coakley, Annie; Garcia del Vello, Pilar; et al.
    Type:Guideline/Assessment Tool
    ID:12718. From Disaster Lit®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
     

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